Tushita’s contemporary reflection on Appliqué

The core idea behind my creating and designing these hand embroidered artworks is to highlight the beauty and importance of hand embroideries, which seem to be diminishing- thanks to the adoption of fast fashion labels across the globe.  With this humble attempt, I wish to elevate hand embroidery to a more artistic and tasteful level.

The Art Of Appliqué in India 

Appliqué is derived form the Latin word ‘applicare’ meaning ‘to fold’ or ‘to fasten’. It is the technique of applying colorful fabric pieces on the base fabric. Raw edges of these patches are finished with a definite mode of stitchery work. It developed as a means of mending old cloth or old garments from economical considerations. There are a vivid variety of Indian textiles in woven, embroidered, printed and other techniques. Appliqué is a textile technology that survives till today, not enjoying any royal patronage, but as an essential part to daily existence.

Vaishnavism and Raas Leela’s history in Manipur

Today is Janamasthami, celebrated as the birth of the Indian god Krishna, let us take a small journey to the picturesque North Eastern state of Manipur. Why Manipur on Krishna's birthday? This is because Krishna is still celebrated here in every form, through religion, art, architecture and the beautiful Manipuri dance.

‘Impresario:A Heritage Foundry’ Interview with Stephen Barker, author and military historian

On Impresario: A Heritage Foundry we present an interview with Stephen Barker. A heritage advisor and museum consultant for museums in England, Stephen has been researching on the role of Indians as part of the British army during the World Wars. He closely examines their lives and activities on the battlefield and after. ‘The Museum Memories Project’ catches up with him on his latest book called 'Lion of the Skies: Hardit Singh Malik, the Royal Air Force and the First World War’ (it is called 'The Flying Sikh' outside India).

Albert Hall, Jaipur

The Rajasthan State government run Central Museum in Jaipur is still popularly known as the Albert Hall. It was designed by architect Sir Swinton Jacob inspired by the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, in the Indo – Sarcenic style and opened as a Museum in 1887. It was built to commemorate the visit of Albert,... Continue Reading →

‘The Museum Memories Project’ is 2

The Museum Memories Project turned 2 on 15th April, 2022, and we are overwhelmed with your love. We have nearly 100 memories of museums visited by our contributors from all over the world!!! It’s the world’s 1st free digital archive and resource of museum memories and much more 😊 To celebrate our 2nd birthday, we have completed the the 1st phase of our website https://www.themumeproject.com/

Adieu, Karni

Adieu, Karni With heart wrenching pain, I write this tribute for one of India's greatest and youngest museum directors, Karni Singh Jasol 💔 s I write this, Karni was spearheading one of the most exciting projects transforming Mehrangarh into one of the super best museums in the world, and we were waiting with bated breath for its unveiling. He had already co curated some of the world’s most amazing exhibitions in the US, based on the Mehrangarh museum’s collection, he was on a spree to take Jodhpur to the world and winning.

Part 4: Rajmata’s other love: the City Palace Museum, Jaipur

Part 4: Rajmata other love: the City Palace Museum, Jaipur I am lucky that I knew Rajmata slightly personally. She had heard of my father in London where he was pursuing his Phd at SOAS and on his return to his job as Deputy Keeper at the Indian Museum, Kolkata, she had tried to contact him. My father’s evil boss had thrown away Rajmata’s letters of invitation so when my father received a call from someone calling himself Maharaj Prithviraj from Jaipur inquiring why the letters were not replied to, Baba thought it was a prank by his evil boss. Then Maharaj Prithviraj met with him and that started a lifelong bond between them.

Part 3: A passionate affair begins

Part 3: A passionate affair begins The MGD School is located at Sawai Ram Singh Road on 26 acres of land, you cannot miss it. It houses separate buildings for the senior and junior schools, has two large playing grounds, a big stadium, a rose garden, a swimming pool, two basketball courts, a music and art room, five hostels for different ages, and a hostel for female faculty, several labs, an extremely well stocked library and an infirmary for the unwell girls. It still remains a girl school, a sanctuary for many.

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